Why We Need to Talk About 6, 7, and 8-Figure Businesses

Why it's important to talk about 6, 7, and even 8-figure businesses

Is it all glitz?

Lately, I’ve seen a great deal of pushback against the glitzy promises in Facebook ads or webinars about 6 or 7-figure businesses.

People say they don’t need or want to grow a 6 or 7-figure business. They’re tired of the hype. They just want to figure out how to make what they have… work.

When I started my business, I wanted to earn enough to stay home with my daughter and still drink daily iced lattes. My goal? Maybe $500 per month.

As my first year in business progressed and I quickly surpassed my old salary (not a huge accomplishment), it started to dawn on me that I had created a full-time job.

I had to work at least 35-40 hours a week to maintain the work that was now paying bills. It was working but it wasn’t very exciting.

Soon, I was introduced to people who were earning quite a bit more than I was but had similar businesses, similar experience, and similar audiences. “What was the difference?” I thought to myself.

They had a different goal and, because of that, they had designed their businesses to earn 6 or 7-figures instead of 4 or 5.

What’s the difference?

They didn’t get lucky. They weren’t working harder.

They simply designed their businesses to perform differently. And they believed in their ability (and the business’s) to perform to their goals.

I didn’t know this was possible when I started my business. Sometime in my life, I had arbitrarily assigned myself an earning ceiling around $35,000 (band geeks and religion majors don’t generally earn much).

I initially designed my business to hit that number. When I did, I pushed hard to reach a little higher.

Then I realized that if I just redesigned my business a bit, I could easily hit $120k+. So I did. And I did. I’ve been redesigning it to hit bigger goals ever since and I’ve trained my clients to do the same.

That might sound trite and simplistic. But I assure you, it is not.

Honor what you’ve already achieved.

What I see happen so often is that business owners like you beat themselves up when they haven’t hit the “glitzy” numbers that others have advertised. They don’t recognize—and honor—that they’ve achieved what they designed to achieve.

In other words, there’s a very, very good chance that the revenue you’re bringing in right now is the revenue your business is currently designed to bring in.

Pat yourself on the back. Seriously. Most people can’t get anything off the ground, let alone make offers and sell them to customers they’ve courted with their own two hands (and words). You have already achieved greatly.

Between a rock and a hard place?

Of course, that doesn’t mean you’re at where you’d like to be.

In fact, you might find yourself between a rock (a business that’s paying some or all of the bills) and a hard place (big opportunities or goals that seem just out of reach).

It’s not so much that you or your business is underperforming as that you have a huge opportunity to design it to work better and produce more.

You see, your business is working. If you push harder and harder with the business design you have right now, you won’t make it work more for you. You’ll just be working harder at the model designed to produce what you’ve already produced.

Maybe you haven’t felt like you had the time to market your business properly…

Maybe you wonder how everyone else “keeps up with everything…”

Maybe the Impostor Complex reminds you of all those times when you’ve set a goal and haven’t reached it…

These aren’t personal shortcomings. They’re a result of having a business design that doesn’t match your goals. A smart business design creates time, reduces the amount of effort required of you, makes team-building easy, and makes goals reality.

If you’re going to break through to those sought-after outcomes, you need a new business design.

Would you rather push yourself to make a business work that’s designed to earn $75k per year? Or push yourself to make a business work that’s designed to make $250k per year? Or $1m per year?

It’s the same amount of work. But the work is different and the decisions are different–because the design is different.

Time to commit.

This is why it’s important to talk about 6, 7, and 8-figure businesses. If you don’t know how those businesses work, you can’t design a business that performs that way—nor do you have the information you need to make an informed decision about whether you want to build that kind of business or not.

I assure you: if you want to build a 7-figure business, you can. It’s available to you. It might take you time, research, and experimentation to find the right business design to hit that number. But it’s out there and it is yours if you want it.

Right now, you can choose to work hard at a 5-figure business design or you can choose to work hard at a 7-figure business design.

Yes, people use these numbers to wow you and glitzify you–but under all that is a real need to exposure yourself to something different so you can make an informed decision about the business you want to build.

What will you choose?

I truly hope you choose to stop getting by and start getting ahead with a fresh business design. To help, I’ve created a set of free training focused on guiding you through making simple tweaks that allow you to earn more at a more predictable pace.

Register below to get started or click here for more information.

Design Your Business To Earn More

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You Have to Fall In Love With the “Business Stuff” Too

Jasmine Star, photographer & blogger, on Profit. Power. Pursuit. with Tara Gentile

“I just want to get this business stuff figured out so I can get back to the stuff I actually like.”

I hear that all. the. time.

The thing is, the “business stuff” never goes away. The business stuff is what keeps paying the bills. The business stuff is what allows you to do creative, meaningful work.

And here’s another thing: the business stuff is your job.

Jasmine Star told me, “I am a photographer 20% of the time, and an entrepreneur and business woman 80% of the time.”

Lori Allen told me, “What people think is your job and what is really your job are often two different things.”

If this is the case (and it is), you’ve got to find a way to fall in love with the business stuff.

You can’t just tolerate it, you can’t just push through it.

You have to fall in love with it.

How do you do that?

Start with picking 1 thing about starting or growing your business that you’ve more-than-tolerated, maybe even enjoyed.

Product photography? Getting on the phone with prospects? Making marketing videos? Looking at your numbers?

Create a plan to go all in on that 1 thing.

How would you structure your business differently if you went all in on product photography?

How would you structure your business differently if you went all in on getting on the phone with prospects? Making marketing videos? Looking at your numbers?

Having a focus like that will start making the chemistry happen in other places of your business as well.

Still don’t think you can fall in love with the business side of your business?

Click here to read a very personal story.

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The Incredibly Valuable Opportunity Gap Between Relationship Marketing & Conversion Marketing

The sweet spot is in the gap between conversion marketing and relationship marketing

In digital commerce businesses, there are essentially two schools of thought. For the purpose of this piece, I will call them Conversion Marketing and Relationship Marketing.

Whether a business is in one or the other school is largely determined by the promise the business owner was sold at the beginning of their digital commerce journey.

In Relationship Marketing, the promise is this: you can create content that people love, causing them to love you in turn, and causing them to buy what you sell as a result. You create relationships with people through your digital persona and that relationship builds enough trust to prompt an eventual sale.

This promise is predominantly being sold to life coaches, health coaches, bloggers, brand strategists, career gurus, lifestyle mentors, and anyone tempted to create a clever entrepreneurial portmanteau for their title. It’s being peddled (at surface level) predominantly by beautiful women and the men who adore them.

In Conversion Marketing, the promise is this: you can create content that people are in need of, causing them to click on an ad or message with that content in it, allowing those people to become aware of a product you are selling, and then converting them to a customer over time. You fill information gaps with knowledge (via experience or research), put it in front of the right people, and so precisely fill the need those people have that a certain percentage of prospects will always buy.

This promise is predominantly being sold to niche information marketers, agencies, business service providers, and SaaS entrepreneurs. It’s being peddled by guys who made their first millions selling ebooks to Scrabble-tile jewelry makers and gun-hoarding survivalists.

The building blocks between the two methods are virtually identical. However, the philosophies behind them and the procedure for exploiting them couldn’t be more different.

I predominantly work with business owners in the Relationship Marketing school. I primarily network with and learn from business owners in the Conversion Marketing school. My own business has been built squarely in the incredibly valuable opportunity gap between the two schools.

When I talk to people steeped in either school of thought and introduce them to the “prevailing wisdom” of either, they’re floored. They often don’t even realize the other school of thought exists. This might seem crazy–but it’s true. 

If you want to generate more revenue, grow your business in line with your personal values, and still put a lot of heart and soul into everything you do, building your business in that opportunity gap is the only way to do it.

WHY RELATIONSHIP MARKETING DOESN’T MEASURE UP

The core problem with Relationship Marketing is not that it lacks strategic rigor (it does), it’s that liking you isn’t a good reason to buy from you. It relies on manipulating the potential customer into thinking that hanging out with you is in their best interest.

If you wouldn’t charge someone to hang out after school with you to try the newest neighborhood ice cream stand, don’t charge someone to hang out with you online to talk about the latest personal development trend. Liking or hanging out with someone is not a value proposition.

Good, well-meaning people fall into this trap. Every time I see a sales page that’s focused on helping you speak your truth or live your best life, I know that trap has been sprung. If I can’t tell how your product aligns with a customers’ true need or goal, the effect (whether intentional or not) is asking people to hang out with you for a price.

Another big problem with trying to be likable so others buy from you is that you end up changing yourself and your choices to appear more aligned with what your perceived audience likes. This does not necessarily mean just making your hair blonder, your waist thinner, or your yoga mat cleaner. It also includes becoming more vulgar (if that’s your schtick—and there are more than a few of those folks out there), becoming geekier, or telling everyone how much you don’t GAF precisely because you really GA a lot of Fs.

You were attracted to this form of marketing so that you could just be yourself and, instead, you find yourself becoming someone else. Of course, “being yourself” isn’t marketing. Being yourself is being yourself—something we should all be able to do regardless of the ROI on who you are.

Finally, likability doesn’t scale. You will get people who will buy from you just because they like you. Often, you’ll get people to buy from you just because you bought from them. But in the end, if you’re not delivering something people actually need, your offers will peter out and you’ll be forced to find new ways to get the same people to pay to hang out with you.

With incredibly few, unreplicable exceptions, if you see someone who has predominantly marketed themselves or their business on their likability factor that has scaled to mass volume, you can bet they’ve put some serious money, strategy, and analysis into that success.

Have you fallen into any of the traps of Relationship Marketing? Here are some things you might have thought over the years that indicate you have:

  • I can’t email my list any more than this because they might not like me and unsubscribe.
  • I don’t want to write good headlines for my blog posts because people will think I’m just like those other guys.
  • Everything I’ve done so far has been really organic, if I try to get strategic now people will probably leave.
  • I shouldn’t need to advertise—people should just be naturally attracted to what I’m creating.
  • I’m not going to use a popup because if people like my content, they’ll find a way to subscribe.

The truth is that there have been times when I have said or thought these things too. However, because I study Conversion Marketing, I know that each of these things is proven—over and over again—to increase ROI, customer satisfaction, long-term growth, brand awareness, and more.

But let’s look at Conversion Marketing more closely.

THE WILD WORLD OF CONVERSION MARKETING

For our purposes, I’m going to define Conversion Marketing—also known as Direct Response Marketing—as the practice of using analysis and metrics to understand a market, create to their specifications, and scale. 

There are a number of problems with pure Conversion Marketing as well. The first is that most people selling to aspiring success stories in this space are selling a formula or proven procedure for results. It can seem like making $10k every night while you’re asleep is just a 5-step process away.

The thing that’s so seductive about these processes is that there is a lot of good information and strategy behind them. You can learn a lot by immersing yourself in one of these formulas. However, the wholesale execution of that same formula will likely not bring about the promised results.

This is because the creators of these formulas discount their own knowledge and understanding of the markets they’re selling to and, also, other people’s formulas. As an example, Ryan Levesque—creator of the Ask system—has made millions of dollars in unusual niches following the survey funnel system he teaches. However, when it came to a mass launch of a digital program based on the marketing system itself, he chose to incorporate Jeff Walker’s video-based Launch system into his campaign.

Now, I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with this. That was a brilliant approach to the campaign. However, I would bet that more people were paying attention to the quiz and funnel parts of the system than to the way he adapted his own process to better fit his needs.

Another problem with Conversion Marketing is that it tends to teach that data can tell the whole story. Your page views, CPC, CPL, conversion rate, survey responses, etc… show you exactly what to do next, if only you know how to correctly interpret and manipulate the information at hand.

Data does tell you a great deal about your next moves, especially (and this is a huge caveat) when it is the right data interpreted the right way.

However, there is a reason that big businesses with giant marketing budgets and access to incredible amounts of data are hiring anthropologists at an increasing rate:

People are data, too.

For every click, for every lead, for every conversion, there’s a person there. They have fears, desires, goals, and a distinct worldview. The best marketers care about those things beyond the numbers. They know that each customer’s unique experience must influence the way data is interpreted. 

Have you fallen into the traps of Conversion Marketing? Here are some indicators:

  • You (or your team) spend more time parsing spreadsheets than talking to customers.
  • Your offers are full of low-hanging fruit.
  • You make decisions about campaigns or products based solely on data.
  • A/B testing is the only way you decide what works.

Measured against customer interviews and research, any of these tactics is a win. But used on their own, the growth of the business is severely limited.

THE (NOT SO) DIRTY LITTLE SECRET OF DIGITAL COMMERCE

As I mentioned earlier, I’ve built my business straddling the divide between these two schools of thought. The dirty little secret of digital commerce is that so has anyone else who’s made good money online doing something they love.

The beautiful women (and the men who adore them) who espouse the benefits of Relationship Marketing are paying close attention to their conversation rates, cost per clicks, paid traffic campaigns, and survey result spreadsheets. The guys selling to the Scrabble-tile jewelry makers and the gun-hoarding survivalists send personal emails to customers and get on the phone for in-depth research.

Don’t believe me?

Note: None of these references are an endorsement or a disavowal. They’re just references.

Derek Halpern talks about how he conducts phone interviews in this episode of Smart Passive Income.

Danielle LaPorte talks about how GTFL (Grow the F*%&ing List) is the top priority of her business (just after self-expression) in this episode of Profit. Power. Pursuit.

Kimra Luna spends massive amounts on ads and talks about it on Rick Mulready’s podcast.

Brian Clark and team give a weekly masterclass on the intersection between the two schools of thought every week on the Digital Entrepreneur podcast.

When you combine the best of Relationship Marketing with the best of Conversion Marketing, you discover an incredible opportunity. You can be human and run your business with smart practices. You can be data-driven and relationship-focused. You can optimize for profit and maximize for loyalty.

Now, there’s not some vast conspiracy here (that I know of—and I think I would have uncovered that by now). What happens is that you get yourself into an information silo as a business owner or aspiring entrepreneur. You only listen to the Marie Forleos and you don’t realize there’s a whole other school of thought; or, you only listen to the Frank Kerns and you don’t realize there’s a group of people doing things entirely differently.

The popular kids in each of these schools of thought, however, are not siloed. They’re networking with each other. They’re finding out what’s really working for who and why. They’re trading best practices and opening up about their standard operating procedures.

This is the real lesson here.

You have to talk to people who do things differently to get better at what you yourself do. Any information silo in your business will hurt your long-term growth and eventually damage what you’ve worked so hard to build.

After reading this post, your first step is to step out of your information silo. You’ll need to introduce yourself to some new ideas and some different ways of thinking. There are resources for this linked below.

Some of these ideas will absolutely challenge you. Your assumptions about what’s important about the way you create content, offers, and relationships may be upended (no matter what school of thought you find yourself in now).

Remember to keep your personal business values front and center. That doesn’t mean that you ignore information that doesn’t make you feel comfortable or validated. It means that you objectively weigh whether what you perceive as a guiding principle of your business is based on what you truly believe or based on what you’re hoping to avoid to stay comfortable and safe.

BUSINESS RESOURCES THAT BRIDGE THE OPPORTUNITY GAP

 

Copyhackers blog with Joanna Wiebe and family
Being Boss podcast with Kathleen Shannon & Emily Thompson
Perpetual Traffic podcast with leaders from Digital Marketer
Startup Chat podcast with Steli and Hiten
Creative Giants podcast with Charlie Gilkey
Social Media Marketing podcast with Michael Stelzner
Of course, I’d like to suggest my podcast, Profit. Power. Pursuit., too.

Beyond breaking out of your information silo, I want to give you a set of challenges to complete so that you can start to position your business in the opportunity gap, too.

1) Choose 3 metrics to start tracking on a daily or weekly basis. Make them metrics that actually indicate the potential for sales (i.e. Facebook Likes are not a good metric but things like email subscribers, sales page views, or ad click through rate might be).

2) Get on the phone with 3 business owners this month who do things differently than you do. Don’t just compare notes with your friends–make friends with someone new. 

3) For at least 1 month, regularly use content from 3 new sources (I find podcasts to be the most helpful for this–but blogs work, too) outside your comfort zone.

4) Talk with at least 3 of your best customers this month to find out how they’re doing right now. Get curious about them–not how your business relates to them–and ask open-ended questions about their situation.

Just like with any opportunity gap, positioning yourself in it takes intentional behavior and new habits. These 4 challenges will help you do just that.

In the end, remember there’s always more to the story. Whether your mentors or favorite bloggers are in the Relationship Marketing school or the Conversion Marketing school, dig a little deeper on everything they say or write. Ask yourself why and how what they’re talking about works. That’s the ultimate marketing hack.

Personal Productivity & The Future of Digital Publishing with Chris Guillebeau

ppp_chrisguillebeau

Tara:  How do you balance the pursuit of art and ideas with the pursuit of profit?  That’s the fundamental question we tackle on Profit. Power. Pursuit.  I’m Tara Gentile, your host, and together with CreativeLive, we explore the unique strategies that creative entrepreneurs use to take control of their lives, profit from their passion, and pursue greatness.

Today, I sit down with Chris Guillebeau, the New York Times bestselling author of the $100 startup.  An accomplished travel hacker, he has visited every country in the world 193 in total, before his 35th birthday.  Every summer in Portland, Oregon, he hosts the World Domination Summit, a gathering of remarkable, creative people.  Chris and I talk about how he still manages to do a lot of the work in his business, what systems he has in place to make sure everything gets done, and the key way he sees online publishing changing.

Chris Guillebeau, welcome to Profit. Power. Pursuit. Thank you so much for joining me.

Chris:  Awesome. Thank you so much for having me, Tara.

Tara:  Absolutely.  So let’s just get started by kind of talking about what all the different moving pieces to your business are.  You’ve got … You’ve always got a lot going on, so I’d love for you to just kind of explain to everyone what are all the different ways that your business or businesses are generating revenue right now.

Chris:  I do always have a lot going on for better or for worse.  I don’t know if that’s a good thing.  I can’t always keep track of it myself, but I would say maybe first and foremost, I’m an author, I write books, and I actually like the process of writing books.  I like everything associated with the publishing process and going on tour, seeing the books translated around the world, so that’s probably my main business.  It’s not something that I do to accomplish, you know, something else, but then maybe for the past 10 years or so, I’ve also produced a number of products.  I’ve done digital products, I’ve done eBooks and courses.  I have a business called unconventional guides that I operated for a while.  It’s still around, although I’m kind of phasing out of it.  I have a membership site called Travel Hacking Cartel, and I also do a lot of different events.  And there’s probably some other stuff in there, too.

Tara:  Yeah.  How about speaking?

Chris:  I do speak.  It’s not really a revenue model for me.  It’s more something that I do to kind of connect with readers, and you know, just to be out and about around the world.  But once in a while.

Tara:  Got ya.  Nice.  So you’re in Jakarta right now, and I think a lot of people know that you do a lot of traveling, and one of our listeners asked me specifically, you know, she just really wanted to know how people like you manage their time, and so I was trying to think about, like, how do I ask Chris Guillebeau how he manages his time when there is probably not a typical day in your life.  So instead, I’d love to know what are some of the systems that you have in place to make sure that everything gets done?

Chris:  You know, the greatest system that I have is that I love my work.  Like, I absolutely love what I do, and I feel very fortunate that I have the ability to write books and to publish the blog and connect with people, and so I’m very motivated by that.  Like it’s what I want to do.  If I won the Powerball, I’m pretty sure that tomorrow, I’d be doing exactly the same thing, and so that helps a lot.  I mean, when I say that’s the greatest system, it really helps a lot, because I get up in the morning, and I’m like let’s get to work.  Let’s do fun stuff, and yeah, I’m on the road all the time.  I’m traveling.  So I like to take time to see the cities and, you know, go on walking tours and have different experiences and discoveries, but then I’m also eager to kind of get back and do my stuff.  So you know, I always have my laptop with me.  I’m always kind of working on the next thing.  I’m a big list person.  You know, I love kind of writing things down and checking them off, and I always carry a notebook with me where I’m outlining stuff and planning ideas.  And so I get behind on things, it’s because I have too much going on, but I’m really motivated to keep going.  So that’s really the greatest system.

Tara:  Nice.  Is there any software systems that you use to kind of manage your day or manage your to-do list?

Chris:  Sure, sure.  Yeah.  I mean, I use Omnifocus.  That’s my number one, like, task, you know, program.  I don’t think it really matters which one you use as long as you have something that works for you, but that’s what I do, and then I have a lot of stuff in Evernote as well, which is great, because as most of the listeners probably know, you can access data from all kinds of different locations and devices, and it becomes more helpful the more you use it, so there’s that, and there’s some other stuff, but it’s all kind of cobbled together.  There’s no, like, one master system.

Tara:  Perfect.  So I’m sure, I know, actually, that another system you have is a team around you in your various ventures, and I’m privileged to be friends with a couple of people that are on your team.  So can you tell us a little bit more about what that team looks like and how they’re organized?

Chris:  Yes.  I should say, I am kind of a classic solopreneur.  You know, I was always doing my own stuff for a while, and I like working independently, so I don’t have like a huge team.  I have one employee, one full-time assistant, and she’s wonderful.  She’s been with me for a year now, but you know, for all the time before that, I was kind of doing a lot of stuff myself.  For the events that we do, we definitely have a team.  That’s not something I can do on my own, so I’m really grateful for them, but a lot of them are volunteers, some of them get a stipend, but maybe there’s 10 of those people.  We all work virtually, and then when I’m home in Portland, Oregon, most of them are based in Portland as well, and so we do have regular meetings either every other week, or once an event is approaching, every week, but everybody kind of does their own stuff, and everybody manages themselves for the most part, which is great, because I’m not a good manager.

Tara:  Yeah, that’s excellent.  I love the sense of independence that they each have, and I think it brings kind of a sense of creativity to your team as well.  I can see that, you know, in the different events that you do and just the way they talk about the ownership that they have over the work that they do with you.

Chris:  That’s good.  No, I’m glad to hear you say that.  I think it can be frustrating for some people.  That kind of work style doesn’t work for everyone, so it’s really important to get the right people, you know, in place for that, but for me, I think it’s a tremendously valuable skill whether you want to be an entrepreneur, whether you want to think entrepreneurially in another career working for someone else or working for a company.  It’s an extremely valuable skill to be able to kind of figure stuff out, basically, and to have a project or to have a responsibility, but not necessarily be given, like, here are the steps, you know, one through eight that you have to follow.  And so if you can find people like that, there’s just so much value there. 

Tara:  Yeah.  I think that’s a great point for everyone, because team-building is also a huge thing that our listeners are really interested in figuring out and finding out what’s working for people, and so I hear you saying essentially that you need to put together the team that’s going to work for you, and that that doesn’t mean that it has to look like a conventional job, or that it has to look like a conventional employee relationship, or that it even has to look like a conventional, like, management relationship.  That it can be something that works for you and works for a very specific type of person, and it doesn’t have to be a great fit for everyone.

Chris:  Right, exactly.  I mean … so it has to work for you as the business owner or the entrepreneur or whatever, but then it also has to work for that person, you know, as well.  So it’s not necessarily the easiest thing to find, but I think it’s something that’s kind of worth … worth investing in, you know, because anybody can follow a list of tasks, but it takes creativity, as you said.  It does take some entrepreneurial thinking to kind of figure stuff out and decipher it, and that I think is a skill that everyone can improve on regardless of your field, your industry, it doesn’t matter what you went to college for.  This is something that kind of sets people apart in life in general.

Tara:  Got you.  So you mentioned that you’re still doing a lot in your business or at least with the writing side of the business now.  What are some of the tasks that we might be surprised to learn you still actually do?

Chris:  Huh.  I mean, pretty much any sort of administrative task I still do it from time to time.  I mean, just putting together newsletters, I do all of my own social media.  I don’t know.  I guess … I guess there’s not much that I don’t do, but I also don’t want to take anything away from the people who, you know, work on stuff with me.  Like I’m very grateful for them.  I just don’t have much of a separation between like here are like these top level task and here are like these low-level administrative tasks, and maybe that’s something I need to work on, but at the same time, it’s also kind of helped me not get too distant from things.  It’s helped me kind of, you know, have direct contact with people and understand, like, where they’re going, what’s going on with them, and how I can hopefully be helpful or be of service in some way to them.

Tara:  Mm.  Do you have any kind of automation in place in your business, or are you pretty hands on with the day-to-day, you know, this needs to get done, that needs to get tweeted out, etc.?

Chris:  Very little.  I mean, I don’t have a problem with scheduled tweets or something.  Like that’s fine.  Like, we might like put up some posts or something that go out at different times, but I … I think, like, it’s important to not be disingenuous with it, you know?  If you’re sharing some content that you’ve written at some point, you know, nobody cares whether you’re like live-tweeting that or something, but otherwise, I try to be pretty, pretty hands on.

Tara:  Got you.  And you said you’re not a great manager, but I’m curious how you manage your team, if at all.

Chris:  Correct.

Tara:  You know, what … how do you set expectations?  How do you communicate with them on a regular basis?

Chris:  Well, we talk pretty much every day.  I mean, we talk by email, usually, or by chat or something.  The WDS team, we use Slack, which is a great network for keeping in touch with people in different time zones and things.  But I don’t like I said, I really don’t think I’m a great manager, so I try to focus on … I try to focus on the goal.  Like, okay, what are we actually trying to achieve here?  What are we hoping to do?  And then there’s lots of moving parts, and you know, as we said, the right people kind of pick up those parts and run with it, because you know, to go back to where we started, if you’re motivated by what you do, if you enjoy what you do, then you’re probably going to do it a lot better than if you’re just doing something because you have to do it.  So wherever you can find that magic fix, you know, between your own skills and the people that you’re working on, that’s where you’re going to see far greater success.  So that’s what I try to do.

Tara:  So the next question is one that I’ve asked just about every one of our guests, and the answers have been very different, and I’m really interested to see how you’re going to answer it.  So how do you balance the roles of writer and executive in your business?

Chris:  I think there’s a big tension there, and I think it’s a natural tension, it’s a healthy tension because I do enjoy, like, doing more than one thing.  I’m not good, you know, just working on one project at a time, but then, of course, there’s a cost to that.  So I think, you know, every year, I kind of evaluate, like, am I happy with the balance?  Am I, you know, am I creating art?  Am I actually writing?  That’s how I got started in this.  Or am I focused too much on business stuff?  And I think maybe a year or so ago, I went away and felt like I had, I wasn’t writing enough, and so I tried to focus more on that, but then I miss the other thing.  So I don’t know, I just go back and forth.  I guess every day I try to make progress on the things that I believe in.  I have these, it’s like kind of values-driven.  It’s like I’m not happy if I’m not writing on a regular basis, and so I know if I get away from that, I have to go back.  So I don’t know if it’s 50/50, I don’t know if it’s a precise balance, it’s more of like on a general basis, am I making progress on these things that I’ve identified are important to me?  If yes, I’ll be happy.  If no, I won’t be.

Tara:  Yeah.  I’m really intrigued that you mentioned kind of it being values-driven.  What are some of the values that you put, that you prioritize in your business and the way you work?

Chris:  I would say the, you know, the number two, the number one and number two values, and they’re interconnected, is these questions that I asked myself, like you know, what am I making, what am I creating, and whom am I helping?  Right?  And so it’s like every day, because most of us, like there’s all kinds of stuff that we could do, and the beautiful thing about this kind of creative work is there’s so many opportunities, but the tragedy of this, you know, creative work is that there’s so many opportunities, and how do we choose to focus, and so whenever I become overwhelmed, I try to go to these questions.  Like okay, am I making something, or am I just kind of spinning my wheels?  And if I’m spinning my wheels, I need to get out of that and focus on creating something, you know, that I can identify and point to and have some value for people, and then hopefully, I’m not just doing something that’s self-referential or, you know, self-glorifying, but it’s actually making a difference in people’s lives.  So am I making something?  Am I helping people?  If I’m doing that, that’s great.  If not, I need to adjust.

Tara:  Mm.  So continuing along that thought, every year, you post an annual review to your blog, and I know it’s a really popular post, and you know, it’s less about the kind of income reports that a lot of people put out at the end of the year every month and a lot more about the exact questions that you’re asking and the kinds of goals that you’re setting for yourself, and kind of a check-in on the goals that you did set for yourself and all of that good stuff, and as I was reading over this past year’s annual review to prep for the interview, I saw that you mentioned that you see a big change in online publishing coming, and I would really love to pick your brain on this, because I know what I think I see coming, but I know that you’re in a lot of different areas than I am.  So what is this change that you see coming, and how do you think you’re going to adapt your own approach to ride that wave or to take advantage of it?

Chris:  Well, don’t give me too much credit here.  I don’t think I’m a futurist.  I don’t think I’m like, “Hey, here’s what’s coming.”  I think I’m more of an observer that’s like, “Hey, here’s what’s already arrived.”

Tara:  Yeah.

Chris:  Like, you know what I mean?  Like this has actually happened, and I actually feel like I was kind of late to observe this, and I feel like everything that we have said for years, all of the great advice, you know, at least that I’ve dispensed, I don’t know if it’s as relevant as it once was.  I wrote a manifesto a few years ago called 279 days to overnight success.  It was one of the things I did when I was kind of first building my career, and it was like this case study model of how I, you know, built a sustainable business doing online writing, and so for years and years, like, that’s been out there, and you know, for years and years, I’ve said I think those lessons are still kind of relevant, and now I’m starting to think, like, well, the strategy of connecting with people and creating is still very much, you know, relevant.  That’s never going to change.  But I do think there have been so many changes in online publishing.  I think the thought leader space is incredibly crowded.  Everybody has a message; everybody has something to offer.  I think formats have changed.  I think platforms have changed a lot.  And it’s not just a matter of like, you know, this network is going down and this network is on the rise.  I think, you know, some of the traditional advice, which was, you know, well-meaning and accurate for a long time was all about this like hub and spoke model of like okay, so you got to, you know, built your hub, and like everything else is kind of a, you know, an anchor or something that drives people, you know, to your blog, but you really want to make sure everybody is on your site, and I think that’s still … that’s still great if you can make it work, right?  But you know, I think more and more people are choosing to be deliberate and engaging with platforms directly, and they actually want more of their stuff to be just on Facebook or on Instagram or Snapchat or whatever it is.  I don’t think the specific platform is as important as this overall trend.

Chris Guillebeau on Profit. Power. Pursuit. with Tara Gentile

I think, you know, maybe to kind of sum up what I see as either coming or has arrived, I would say the next big thing is small, and you know, the next big thing is far, far more focused on connecting with maybe not hyper-specific, but you know, much more intentional, smaller groups and going deeper than going broader.  And the thing is, people have said this for years, but I don’t know that they really believed it.  You know what I mean?  Like they were always like, “Oh, it’s far more important to have this small group of people and really focus on them than to like try to build a huge email list or a huge social media following or whatever it is, but in reality, I think most of us were like, oh, yeah, but it’d be really awesome, you know, to have the really big list or the really big social following.  And so you know, even though we said, okay, we’re going to focus small, but you know, our strategy is still kind of big.  I feel more and more and more that the people who are actually going to be successful on a scalable level, like, are intentionally and deliberately focused on that small group to the exclusion of anything else.  And that’s something I think you’ve done really well.  That’s something I see a few other people doing well, but I think a lot of people are still kind of behind.  A lot of people are using tactics that, you know, may have worked five years ago, but not necessarily going to work now, you know?

It’s like … I’ll tell you a quick story, and if this is going on too much, just tell me.

Tara:  No, it’s great.

Chris:  But when I first started, you know, online business, like so long ago, it’s like 17 years or something, you know, there was this new website called Ebay.com.  I went on Ebay.com, and I could like buy and sell, and it was a seller’s market at the time.  At the time, when EBay first got started, you could go to the store and buy things, and then put them on EBay, and people would pay more for it because it was like this new thing.  It was like, “Wow, I’m buying stuff on the internet.  Isn’t that cool?”  You know?  So that was fun, obviously, but it didn’t last because it’s a gold rush, you know.  It’s like this arbitrage thing that happens when something is new.

So the same thing has been true in online publishing, internet marketing, whatever you want to call it.  A number of years ago, you could, like, I’ll write an eBook, and I’ll write an eBook on, you know, I don’t know, how to clean my house better or something, and everybody will, you know, spend $100 on it.  That doesn’t work anymore.  You know.  I think things have changed so much because everybody has an eBook, everybody has a course, blah, blah, blah.  So I have a lot more thoughts, but I just talked for like three minutes, so I’ll stop now.

Tara:  No, I loved it.  Well, okay, so that got me … Actually, let me back up.  I love what you said about how people are being intentional about spreading their content out in a lot of different, or maybe not a lot of different places, but several different places now where they’re not putting quite as much value on the hub, although I do think people are still putting a lot of value on email lists, it’s less about the particular place people are going as long as there’s some way for them to get back on their email list eventually, but they’re putting content on Medium or they’re putting content on Facebook, and that doesn’t seem to be letting up at any time soon.

Chris:  Sure.  Sure. 

Tara:  But I also really liked and appreciated the way you talked about going small and how that’s going to help people create stronger connections with the people that they’re looking to serve, but I also think, as you kind of alluded to, that this idea of passive income, or at the very least, leveraged income is so attractive that people keep getting off-track with this idea of going small.  So could you talk a little bit about what you might see the relationship being between a small, focused, highly-engaged audience and this desire for passive or leveraged income?


Chris:  I think, I mean, this just relates to a classic, you know, business idea of what problem are you trying to solve, and I think a lot of people who are starting out now really don’t have a clear answer for that, and it’s probably our fault, the people who have been around for a while, you know.  I would say it’s our fault because, like, we didn’t necessarily have to have great answers for that many years ago.  I mean, we could, obviously, like, we could still focus on solutions, and focus on being helpful and genuine.  I don’t think it was, you know, fraudulent or something, but you know, I do think it was much broader and much more scattered, and I think, you know, the people who are successful now, whether it’s smaller pockets or bigger pockets, they really do have a clear and specific answer for that, and they’re not trying to be like this big thought leader, you know this online celebrity or whatever.  I mean, some people with really small email lists or social media followings or whatever can do very, very well.  You know, as you know.  I mean, you know lots of folks with stories and examples like that, whereas, you know, there’s many people who have very large followings who are actually struggling a bit, or not nearly as successful as you might expect them to be, and I mean, just a quick point on the email list, it’s like I totally agree that an email list is super, super valuable.  It’s one of those things where, yeah, if you could do only one thing, sure that’s great, but I also think we have to be mindful of giving people what they want, and I think what people want is changing quite a bit, and not everybody wants to give you their email, you know, sadly.  It’s kind of like the way I think about Facebook, because for years, I didn’t really like Facebook very much, and I was just kind of like Facebook is not my platform, I’m just not going to go there.  What I kind of realized over time was it’s not really about me, you know?  Because if my community, if a lot of people in my audience or whatever, if they like Facebook, then that’s where I should be.  You know, I have to find, I have to like adjust because it’s not like, you know, going to my readers and saying, hey, readers, like stop, stop, you know, this behavior or this pattern that you like.  You know, come and join my email list, right?  And so what’s interesting is you can look at lots of people who’ve been very, very successful, you know, just building businesses on social, which I understand is completely the opposite of the advice, you know, that we’ve given to people over the years, and I have, too.

Think about something just briefly before we go on, like Humans of New York.  I would say probably everybody listening to this is familiar with Humans of New York.  If not, obviously, go and look it up.  This guy has, you know, millions and millions of followers.  Does he even have a website?  I don’t know.  I mean, I guess he probably does, but I would say 99, you know, percent plus people, you know, have become familiar with this project and become passionate fans of this project simply through the stories that he shared through social.  So it’s a totally tricky thing because I guess it relates to where we started, it’s a whole new world, and it’s not like everybody should like shut down their website and their email list, but I think people should pay attention, because, you know, change is coming, change has already arrived, and the people who went are the ones who are aware of that and can adjust going forward.

Tara:  Yeah.  I love your point about giving people what they want, being very mindful of what people want as well, and I’m sure you can make decisions that work for you in that paradigm as well, but really being intentional about understanding and delivering on what people want, and I’m really glad that you mentioned Facebook, too, because I had totally forgotten about that, but I’ve noticed recently, maybe within the last four or five months how much your Facebook strategy has completely changed.

Chris:  Yup.

Tara:  Can you give us a little bit more detail on that?

Chris:  Yeah, you’re so kind when you say it completely changed.  You mean, like, all of a sudden I started posting.

Tara:  Yes, that’s what I mean.

Chris:  That was the change of strategy, right?  Before, I had a Facebook page and people could like it, but I didn’t do anything there, and then I had this great idea of like actually posting, you know, to my page.  That was the big insight I had last year.  And you know, historically, I loved Twitter.  Twitter was like, that’s my network.  I’m so … I’m comfortable there.  I like that, you know, but what I noticed was, you know, people were engaging less and responding less, and so that’s when I was like, well, I have to figure out where the people are, and so just as an experiment, I started posting more on Facebook, started seeing much more, much greater responsiveness and engagement, so I just followed them there.  I don’t think the lesson for listeners, necessarily, is Facebook is better than Twitter.  That’s not the point because that’s going to change again in two or three months or six months or whatever.  Again, the lesson is where we started, like give people what they want.  Figure out where they are and go to them, as opposed to saying like here’s where I am, you should come to me.

Tara:  Yeah.  I have done the exact same thing over the last six months.  You know, my whole Twitter life has changed, and I can be sad about that personally, but businesswise, I know the best decision is to go to where my people are, and you know, since realizing that and being very intentional about that, I’ve seen my Facebook following really explode, and I’ve really enjoyed creating content for, specifically for Facebook, but I also really appreciate you saying that you need to give people what they want and go where they want to go, but you know, be intentional about it.  It’s not about following whatever the latest, greatest thing is, it’s about making real decisions for your business.

Chris:  Absolutely.

Tara:  Awesome.  So let’s talk a little bit about the live events that you have been hosting for the past five years.  I’ve told you before that I was at the very first World Domination Summit, and it literally changed my life.  I am so thankful for that experience and the people that I met there.  I am still just a such … I mean, they’re my best friends in the whole world.

Chris:  That’s awesome.

Tara:  Yeah.  So hosting live events has really become a big part of your brand.  It’s something that a lot of people know you for.  Perhaps as much or more so than travel hacking.  So what do live events help you accomplish in your business because I bet it’s not profit?

Chris:  Well, you just said it.  Your kind introduction there of talking about how you came to WDS and it, you know, connected you with greater people, and you know, it’s something that you remembered, and of course, you’ve been part of our stuff for years, which is great.  I think that’s why I do it.  That’s the motivation.  You know, and the motivation for everything I do is to have some sort of impact, and you know, hopefully to, you know, maybe not necessarily be a catalyst in people’s lives, because I think people come to my work when they’re already in a place of like being pro-change or wanting to do something different or wanting to follow a dream or just looking for greater support, but hopefully being like an amplifier to that, and being able to say like, oh, that’s awesome that you’re doing that.  You know, here’s some other people that are also doing awesome things, and you’re not alone and let’s support one another.  So I think that’s very powerful, and it’s not completely like a selfless thing.  It’s not sacrificial.  I benefit from it, too.  I really, really enjoy it.  You know this process of hearing stories like that, so that’s why I do it.

Tara:  Got you.  So I’m going to ask you a selfish question now.

Chris:  Okay.

Tara:  Which is I’m putting on my first event in April, and I would love to know if you had one piece of advice to give me about putting on a live event, what would that be?

Chris:  Hmm, well, one piece of advice, okay.  Yeah, it’s just the problem … the problem is being succinct.

Tara:  Well, I’ve already hired Isaac, so that part is covered.

Chris:  Okay.  That’s good.

Tara:  So something else.

Chris:  Okay, okay.  No, I mean, you’re in good hands with Isaac, of course.  I would say that one thing, maybe, like you kind of touched on is like to really be clear on what your intention and goal for it is, and I’m sure you’ve done that.  You know, you’ve been to many events.  I mean, you’ve spoken at many events, you’ve been on teams for events, so I think you understand, like, what you hope to get out of it, and you understand that it’s probably not profit, or at least that’s not the primary goal.  If you have some kind of, you know, mission-driven focus for it, then I think that’s great.  If you can challenge your attendees in some way, I think that’s also great, you know, leave them wanting more, but of course, you know, try to excel in everything you do.  I’m sure it’ll be great.

Tara:  Wonderful.  Thank you so much.  So let’s talk a little bit more about World Domination Summit for a minute because you’ve made the decision after five years to change up the format in a really big way.  Can you tell us a little bit more about that and why you made that decision?

Chris:  Yeah, so I announced this at last year’s event, and I don’t think I did a very good job, because ever since then, people have been asking about it, and what people are saying is like, oh, you’re making the event smaller, and that’s not necessarily what I was trying to accomplish.  What we’re doing is we are kind of scaling the mainstage component of the event back, which is the weekend focus of like a, you know, Friday to Sunday.  That is going to only 1000 people now instead of 3000 where it’s been the past three years, but then we’re also expanding everything else that happens throughout the week, and so we’re moving to more of like a week-long total experience where I actually hope that we can serve, I don’t know, 3000-5000 people this year probably, but then for the, you know, the immersive portion, we are focusing on a smaller audience.  So it’s kind of a two-prong strategy to better serve the people who are like yes, I want to be fully immersed, you know, I want this kind of special, you know, special high-touch experience, but then also serving people who aren’t able to come to that or who just want to kind of connect with other people but actually formalizing that process so that they have a way to do that.

Tara:  Again, you’re giving people what they want, right?

Chris:  We’ll see.  We’ll find out.

Tara:  All right.  So you’ve got a new book coming out that should be out I think right about when we’re going to be releasing this episode.

Chris:  Awesome.

Tara:  And the book is called Born for This, right?

Chris:  That is correct.  Yeah.  New book is to help people find the work they were meant to do, and this is the culmination of many years of research with all kinds of people who have forged or created unconventional careers, and I found a lot of people who use phrases like I feel like I won the career lottery, you know?  I love what I do, I can’t believe I get paid for this, you know, I would do it for free, but you know, I actually do get paid for it, so that’s even better.  So how did those people, you know, find that work, how did they create it, whether they’re entrepreneurs or whether they think entrepreneurially, but you know, find their best path within a corporate structure or some kind of organization.  Like my mom, for example, was a rocket scientist for NASA.

Tara:  I didn’t know that.

Chris:  Yeah.  Fun fact.  And if you want to be a rocket scientist, you’re not really freelance most of the time.  You know, most of them work for somebody, and I talked to the first female firefighter in Mississauga, Ontario.  She’s one of my case studies for the book, and so the same kind of story there is like okay, if you want to be a firefighter, like, you have to, you know, do that with other people.  So how do these people like find that work, what lessons do they have that they can offer, and how can readers, you know, find the work they were meant to do.  So I’m excited about that.

Tara:  Brilliant.  I’m excited about that, too.  So beyond the book, what’s next for you?

Chris:  Well, the book is a big thing right now, because just as it’s out, I’m going on the road.  I’m doing thirty cities.  Would love to have, would love to meet up with people.  If you go to BornForThisBook.com, you can get free tickets to any number of events.  That’s about a two to three-month process, then we go into the new WDS, then I hope to just keep doing what I’m doing.  I hope to keep traveling, I hope to keep writing, I hope to keep connecting with people and learning, changing it up as we go, because as we’ve discussed, change is the only constant, but again, I feel very fortunate, so I hope I can keep doing it.

Tara:  When, specifically, is the book coming out?

Chris:  April 5.

Tara:  Love it.  Chris Guillebeau, thank you so much for joining me.

Chris:  Thank you so much.

Tara:  Chris’s CreativeLive Bootcamp, Make Your Dream Trip a Reality can be found by going to CreativeLive.com/business. 

On the next episode, we’ll sit down with Natalie McNeal, author of She Takes on the World and the Conquer Kit.  We went behind the scenes on how she plans her year, grows her email list, and works with her team.  Don’t miss it. 

That’s a wrap for this week’s episode of Profit. Power. Pursuit. CreativeLive podcast.  Download more episodes of this podcast and subscribe on iTunes.  If you appreciate this kind of in-depth content, please leave us a review or share this podcast with a friend.  It means the world to us.

Our theme song was written by Daniel Peterson, who also edited this episode.  Our audio engineer was Kellen Shemezu.  This episode was produced by Elizabeth Madariaga.  You can catch up on older episodes in the iTunes store, where new episodes are added every week, and learn more by going to CreativeLive.com.

The Power of Focus: How Stacey Howe-Lott is Giving Her Husband a Run For His Money

It might be cliche; but it’s truly amazing what you can do when you put your mind to it. A huge part of Quiet Power Strategy is knowing what to focus on and taking action on those things and those things alone.

I knew Stacey Howe-Lott, the founder of Stellar Scores, was making progress on the plan she had created during Quiet Power Strategy. But it wasn’t until a few months ago that I happened to see something truly extraordinary.

Scrolling through my Facebook stream, I noticed a post from her saying she’d just done 500% better in July 2014 over July 2013. And, in fact, that while July was normally her slowest month of the year as an SAT tutor, July 2014 was her highest grossing month ever in business.

Wow.

I had to know what shifted for her.

The first thing was complete focus on her new identity in business: CEO. She isn’t a technician anymore, she’s the powerhouse behind an SAT strategy revolution. Instead of going client to client, she’s seeing her business and how she plans for it in a whole new light.

The second thing was focus on her own special sauce: strategy. For Stacey, tutoring the SAT is about identifying strengths and playing to them. (Really, it’s a beautiful metaphor of the whole theme behind 10ThousandFeet.) When her special sauce became evident, the ideas for scale and leverage became unrelentingly apparent.

What’s more, she hasn’t even had digital products on the market very long. Just knowing her special sauce and repositioning her business around it has kept a steady stream of clients coming in, even in the off months, ready to pay higher prices than Stacey ever dreamed of charging.

Stacey’s new focus has helped her create a plan that will grow with her, products that will introduce whole new markets to her methodology, and positioning that puts her on the top of her industry. But enough from me, let’s hear it from Stacey:

Stacey Howe-Lott’s Story

400px-wideSince taking Quiet Power Strategy™, I’ve doubled my revenue in 7 months and am on track to triple it by 12 months.

I’ve completely become the CEO of my business–first recognizing it as a business, and then stepping into the CEO role. I am a teacher, so I was always focused on the kid in front of me instead of stepping back and looking at my business as a whole.

Tara dragged me, with me kicking and screaming the entire way, from being convinced that the only way I could serve is in 1:1 sessions which didn’t scale, to seeing how I can teach on a much broader scale.

I’ve figured out what I’m great at, what I’m terrible at, and how to leverage my strengths and manage others in order to accomplish my vision.

It was hard to break out of my old mindset. But being on the other side is so easy–I’m able to teach more kids, in less time and with less stress because of all the systems I have in place.

I love the fact that I’ve got a business plan to give my very-well-paid-computer-programmer husband a run for his money as to who can be the top earner in the family. On what planet do teachers ever out-perform computer programmers in income? I love the fact that I’m showing my daughter that she can dream up something out of nothing and make it happen. I love the fact that I am funding my daughter’s college education AND donating money to donorschoose.org to help fund educational projects for other schoolchildren as well.

But mostly I love the fact that I am able to help hundreds of more students learn more efficiently, more effectively, and accomplish their dreams.

***

That’s what focus can do for you. Less stress, more money, more impact, and action that gets results. You in?

Find out more about Stacey and Stellar Scores, click here.

Discerning the Path Forward When You’re Just Starting Out: How Megan Roop Landed Big Opportunities Fast

Decision-making is making a choice between 2 or more alternatives, right? In business, it can often seem like your choices are loud or quiet, big or small.

Discernment, on the other hand, is “the ability to see and understand people, things, or stituations clearly and intelligently.” When you engage your power of discernment, you can see that you don’t have to choose between this or that but that you can integrate what you really want into the options in front of you.

Essentially, when you leverage discernment you fully understand all the possibilities. It’s not just between this or that–but what you can create to make you feel how you want to feel, impact your business the way you want to impact it, and create an experience for the people who matter most that makes them feel great, too.

Discernment requires real insight into who you are, what you want, and the experience you’re creating for your customers. Then decision-making becomes second nature.

Today’s story is about Megan Roop, a coach for women who are ready for complete freedom from their eating disorders. She came to 10ThousandFeet as a brand new business owner. In fact, she hadn’t even launched her website yet.

But that didn’t stop her from creating some amazing results simply by taking focused action on what she really wanted: to give women who feel less than free a voice.

Megan Roop’s Story

M14-682x1024Let’s go back to May 2013 when I had recently found Tara’s work. I immediately loved and appreciated Tara’s no-nonsense, thoughtful approach to building a business. Everything about her felt refreshing to me, so when she opened registration for 10ThousandFeet I considered joining.

But because I was just starting out I decided against the program. I thought it was for people with “real businesses” and the thought of joining without a solid base terrified me. So, I sat on my ideas and while I made important progress behind the scenes, I still wasn’t building a sustainable business.

Throughout the next 9-months I took several coaching and business-building programs designed for people just starting out, but I always finished disappointed. When I saw registration open for 10ThousandFeet in March, I immediately signed up. I was ready to find clarity, move into real action and evolve my ideas. I knew Tara’s program was just the thing to support me.

I worked hard and gave 10ThousandFeet my all. In return, it saved me months of time, frustration and hassle. The solid structure of the program provided me with tools and systems that I’ll be using in my business for years to come. It also cut a big part of the learning curve for someone like me, who was just starting out.

During the program, I launched my website, created an outreach plan, solidified a business model and so much more. But most importantly, everything I’m creating is aligned with who I am and what I value most. In a sea of blueprints and cookie cutter methods, 10ThousandFeet taught me how to build my business in my own unique way.

Now, just a month after finishing the program I’m welcoming new members into my community every day and I’m creating my first product and in-person mini-retreat. I’ve landed placements on MindBodyGreen, an interview with a leader in my field that I truly admire, and more opportunities are coming my way daily. The best part? I feel inspired, energized and more confident than ever.

Tara and Brigitte are an incredible duo who have so much to offer. Tara gets to the heart of the matter like no one else and is someone you can trust with something as important as the legacy you’re creating. She is the real deal, folks. Brigitte has a gift for coming up with outreach ideas that will be meaningful and impactful to your community. She really helped me feel more confident and comfortable with the world of outreach.

If you’re just starting out and worried like I was about being in a program of people with “real businesses,” don’t be. This community is one of the most welcoming and supportive I’ve encountered. You’ll get support and so much more from this program!

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Megan is a perfect example of what can happen when you’re willing to leave the research phase behind and plow into the results phase. Sure, you can keep searching for answers or you can start acting on a personalized plan for your success.

Your choice. Megan made hers.

For more on Megan and her growing community, click here.